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5th Festival of Russian Culture in Dublin from 23rd of February to 2nd of March 2014

DUBLIN TO CELEBRATE RUSSIAN CULTURE
DURING WEEK-LONG FESTIVAL

Packed schedule includes a variety of free-to-attend activities for
all ages and tastes
at locations across the city centre

 5th Festival of Russian Culture in Dublin from 23rd of February to 2nd of March 2014. 

Festival of Russian Culture is proud to announce that renowned artists will be performing at the key events.

Dmitry Babichev, originally from St Petersburg (Russia), have been living in the UK for the last 15 years.

Dmitry has some experience in touring around Russia and the republics. In the summers of 1993 – 1995 he toured around 7 cities across Russia and the republics.

For the last 10 years Dmitry has been performing mostly in Plymouth, Totnes and Exeter so I would be delighted to explore and play in other places like Ireland. He feels that authentic Russian songs could add an international flavor to the rich cultural life of Ireland. There is a reasonable size a Russian speaking community living in Dublin and Trinity College has a Russian department.

Dmitry performs as a solo musician (guitar and vocal), as a duo (guitar and vocal + saxophone / flute) and a 4 piece band (guitar and vocal, saxophone/flute, bass guitar, percussions). He performed at Ignite: Exeter’s Festival of Theatres 2013 (www.igniteexeter.org.uk/shows/dmitry-babichev/) and at the From Devon With Love Festival in Exeter in January 2014 (www.bikeshedtheatre.co.uk/whats-on/dmitry-babichev-and-brian-ibbotson/).

Dmitry says that his songs are unusual because they are not in a mainstream style of music and also they introduce a new area of music, which is totally unfamiliar in the UK and in Ireland. Also during the performance he uses different guitars and his colleague plays either sax or flute.

Currently Dmitry is exploring possibility of holding workshops for A-level Russian History students, BTEC World Music students and Russian faculties of universities.

A wealth of vibrant activities are on offer across Dublin city as part of the fourth annual Festival of Russian Culture, running from March 9th – 14th. Traditional music, dance, children’s activities, lively performances, chess challenges, the best in contemporary cinema, informative exhibitions and lectures are just some of the events taking place at numerous locations across the city. The week long festivities include a family day, traditionally celebrated in Russia as Maslenitsa (“Pancake Day”), where entertainment to appeal to all ages will take place in and around Cow’s Lane and Essex Street, Temple Bar.

The Festival will encompass a selection of venues across the city, with activities certain to suit all cultural tastes in Temple Bar, Trinity College Dublin, The National Library of Ireland, Ilac Library, Dublin City Gallery, The Hugh Lane Gallery, Lighthouse Cinema and the National Gallery of Ireland. This is the fourth outing for the Festival, following on from last year’s massively successful event which saw over 7,000 visitors attend the family day, with many thousands more attending other attractions in the programme during the week. The Festival is organised by Dublin City Council with the participation and support of Moscow City Government.

This year the Festival has successfully secured the renowned Russian writer, journalist and poet Dimtry Bykov who will be giving a literary reading at the Long Room Hub in Trinity College Dublin on Saturday March 9th. Bykov is very well known in Russia and has won awards including the National Bestseller Prize and the Big Book Prize. His work is quite varied from hosting radio and television shows to writing novels, essays and poetry. Irish journalist and writer Conor O’Clery who lived and worked in Moscow will be giving a public lecture on Russia’s love affair with America on Thursday 14th March in the Arts Building in Trinity College Dublin at 6.30pm.

There are many highlights in this year’s programme, particularly the central focus on the family day on Sunday March 10th in Temple Bar. This will feature a variety of performances and Russian food and souvenir stalls, along with entertainment to keep children enthralled, including Russian storytelling, doll painting, fairytale films and face painting, and plenty to keep adults entertained also.

There will be lectures throughout the week on Russian culture taking place in the Long Room Hub in Trinity College Dublin, at the National Gallery of Ireland and Ilac Library with presentations by leading experts on Russian culture, all of which are free to attend.

For those interested in film, there will be a screening of the Russian film Short Stories, winner of the Audience Choice Award at the Vladivostok International Film Festival, at the Lighthouse Cinema on Monday 11th of March at 6.30pm. The film recently screened as part of the Jameson Film Festival and proved hugely popular with audiences. The classic Russian film Doctor Zhivago will also be screened in Wood Quay Venue at 2pm on Monday 11th of March.

One of the most popular events in previous years at the Festival has been the opportunity for members of the public to challenge Russian chess Grand Master Alexander Baburin. Mr Baburin is inviting secondary school students to a workshop in the Wood Quay Venue on the morning of Wednesday 13th and the public can challenge the Master in a mass chess-game at 1.30pm in the Ilac Library and in Wood Quay at 4pm. Chess enthusiasts gathered in their droves last year to watch this spectacle, where the Grand Master took on over 20 players simultaneously, and an even greater crowd is expected this year.

Week-long activities include two exhibitions: a children’s art exhibition in the Ilac Library and photographic exhibition in Pearse Street Library. The children’s art exhibition is a collection of works by schoolchildren from Dublin and surrounding counties who were encouraged to submit their artwork to represent Russian fairytales.

The Festival also has a strong business angle, to encourage ongoing trade between Russia and Dublin. Prominent business leaders from both Ireland and Russia will attend a forum to discuss how to strengthen economic ties between the two countries.

The Russian Cultural Festival is organised by Dublin City Council’s Office of Economy and International Relations and takes place with the kind assistance of Trinity College Dublin, The Russian Gazette, Dublin City Libraries, Temple Bar Cultural Trust, National Library of Ireland, National Gallery of Ireland and The Russian Business Association.

Visit www.dublincity.ie/russianfestival for information. Or find us on Facebook and Twitter.

ENDS

DUBLIN TO CELEBRATE RUSSIAN CULTURE
DURING WEEK-LONG FESTIVAL

Packed schedule includes a variety of free-to-attend activities for
all ages and tastes
at locations across the city centre

Русский «Фестиваль русской культуры в Дублине, с 23 февраля по 2 марта 2014 г.

Оргкомитет рад сообщить, что известные исполнители будут принимать участие в фестивальных мероприятиях.

Dmitry Babichev, originally from St Petersburg (Russia), have been living in the UK for the last 15 years.

Dmitry has some experience in touring around Russia and the republics. In the summers of 1993 – 1995 he toured around 7 cities across Russia and the republics.

For the last 10 years Dmitry has been performing mostly in Plymouth, Totnes and Exeter so I would be delighted to explore and play in other places like Ireland. He feels that authentic Russian songs could add an international flavor to the rich cultural life of Ireland. There is a reasonable size a Russian speaking community living in Dublin and Trinity College has a Russian department.

Dmitry performs as a solo musician (guitar and vocal), as a duo (guitar and vocal + saxophone / flute) and a 4 piece band (guitar and vocal, saxophone/flute, bass guitar, percussions). He performed at Ignite: Exeter’s Festival of Theatres 2013 (www.igniteexeter.org.uk/shows/dmitry-babichev/) and at the From Devon With Love Festival in Exeter in January 2014 (www.bikeshedtheatre.co.uk/whats-on/dmitry-babichev-and-brian-ibbotson/).

Dmitry says that his songs are unusual because they are not in a mainstream style of music and also they introduce a new area of music, which is totally unfamiliar in the UK and in Ireland. Also during the performance he uses different guitars and his colleague plays either sax or flute.

Currently Dmitry is exploring possibility of holding workshops for A-level Russian History students, BTEC World Music students and Russian faculties of universities.

A wealth of vibrant activities are on offer across Dublin city as part of the fourth annual Festival of Russian Culture. Traditional music, dance, children’s activities, lively performances, chess challenges, the best in contemporary cinema, informative exhibitions and lectures are just some of the events taking place at numerous locations across the city. The week long festivities include a family day, traditionally celebrated in Russia as Maslenitsa (“Pancake Day”), where entertainment to appeal to all ages will take place in and around Cow’s Lane and Essex Street, Temple Bar.

The Festival will encompass a selection of venues across the city, with activities certain to suit all cultural tastes in Temple Bar, Trinity College Dublin, The National Library of Ireland, Ilac Library, Dublin City Gallery, The Hugh Lane Gallery, Lighthouse Cinema and the National Gallery of Ireland. This is the fourth outing for the Festival, following on from last year’s massively successful event which saw over 7,000 visitors attend the family day, with many thousands more attending other attractions in the programme during the week. The Festival is organised by Dublin City Council with the participation and support of Moscow City Government.

This year the Festival has successfully secured the renowned Russian writer, journalist and poet Dimtry Bykov who will be giving a literary reading at the Long Room Hub in Trinity College Dublin on Saturday March 9th. Bykov is very well known in Russia and has won awards including the National Bestseller Prize and the Big Book Prize. His work is quite varied from hosting radio and television shows to writing novels, essays and poetry. Irish journalist and writer Conor O’Clery who lived and worked in Moscow will be giving a public lecture on Russia’s love affair with America on Thursday 14th March in the Arts Building in Trinity College Dublin at 6.30pm.

There are many highlights in this year’s programme, particularly the central focus on the family day on Sunday March 10th in Temple Bar. This will feature a variety of performances and Russian food and souvenir stalls, along with entertainment to keep children enthralled, including Russian storytelling, doll painting, fairytale films and face painting, and plenty to keep adults entertained also.

There will be lectures throughout the week on Russian culture taking place in the Long Room Hub in Trinity College Dublin, at the National Gallery of Ireland and Ilac Library with presentations by leading experts on Russian culture, all of which are free to attend.

For those interested in film, there will be a screening of the Russian film Short Stories, winner of the Audience Choice Award at the Vladivostok International Film Festival, at the Lighthouse Cinema on Monday 11th of March at 6.30pm. The film recently screened as part of the Jameson Film Festival and proved hugely popular with audiences. The classic Russian film Doctor Zhivago will also be screened in Wood Quay Venue at 2pm on Monday 11th of March.

One of the most popular events in previous years at the Festival has been the opportunity for members of the public to challenge Russian chess Grand Master Alexander Baburin. Mr Baburin is inviting secondary school students to a workshop in the Wood Quay Venue on the morning of Wednesday 13th and the public can challenge the Master in a mass chess-game at 1.30pm in the Ilac Library and in Wood Quay at 4pm. Chess enthusiasts gathered in their droves last year to watch this spectacle, where the Grand Master took on over 20 players simultaneously, and an even greater crowd is expected this year.

Week-long activities include two exhibitions: a children’s art exhibition in the Ilac Library and photographic exhibition in Pearse Street Library. The children’s art exhibition is a collection of works by schoolchildren from Dublin and surrounding counties who were encouraged to submit their artwork to represent Russian fairytales.

The Festival also has a strong business angle, to encourage ongoing trade between Russia and Dublin. Prominent business leaders from both Ireland and Russia will attend a forum to discuss how to strengthen economic ties between the two countries.

The Russian Cultural Festival is organised by Dublin City Council’s Office of Economy and International Relations and takes place with the kind assistance of Trinity College Dublin, The Russian Gazette, Dublin City Libraries, Temple Bar Cultural Trust, National Library of Ireland, National Gallery of Ireland and The Russian Business Association.

Visit www.dublincity.ie/russianfestival for information. Or find us on Facebook and Twitter.

ENDS